The Flaming Vegan

A Vegan and Vegetarian Blogging Extravaganza

Veganism And Eating Out
Facebook Tweet Google+ Pinterest Email More Sharing Options

Veganism And Eating Out

The main difficulty I find now with being vegan is eating out. It is easy enough at home or when visiting vegan friends, but eating out is often a problem, as animal products are in so many foods (and not just foods). Veganism is harder than vegetarianism, as the latter is becoming much more mainstream now: here in Britain almost all cafes, restaurants, etc., offer at least one vegetarian dish on the menu, and often more than one, but it is often hard to find a vegan dish.

Sometimes you find you can convert a vegetarian dish to a vegan one, e.g. a meat-free roast dinner can be made vegan if you leave out the Yorkshire pudding! Quite often though, I find I have to have a mixture of starters and side-dishes, rather than a full meal, which can be awkward. Eating out definitely involves more planning and consideration, than when I was an omnivore. The one exception to the rule is Asian restaurants, and particularly Indian and Japanese ones: there are usually a selection of delicious vegetable curries and accompaniments on the menu, so I always enjoy a trip to an Indian, Chinese or Japanese restaurant. Japanese food lends itself quite easily to veganism, through their use of tofu and edamame, which I am very fond of.

I also find it a pain trying to find vegan sandwiches, if I need a snack or light meal: once again, being vegetarian = easy, being vegan = often going without. Sometimes it is possible to find a falafel or roasted vegetable sandwich or wrap, for example (but it is not vegan if it has butter or mayonnaise in it). It's usually so hard trying to find a suitable sandwich, so I instead I will buy chips, crisps, nuts, fruit, salads, or vegetable samosas. I am also a fan of the pasta in sauce which comes ready to eat in a tub; that is quite often vegan. So eating out definitely involves more thought and effort (reading all the food labels, etc) but it is becoming easier and more natural to me now.

Healthy Snacks Delivered Monthly

Leave a Comment

  1. Carolyn
    Carolyn
    Vote #2 Veganara! Question: What is a vegetable samosa?
    Log in to reply.
    1. Akanksha
      Akanksha
      Its a triangular case of fine wheat flour deep fried with vegetable filling inside. Mostly they are available in potato only filling.
      Log in to reply.
      1. Carolyn
        Carolyn
        Thanks for the info Akanksha! Learned something new!
        Log in to reply.
  2. Akanksha
    Akanksha
    It is true..checking ingredients every time you order out is quite an overhead. I never bothered when i wasn't a veg but now i do mindful eating and am proud of that achievement.
    Log in to reply.
    1. Veganara
      Veganara
      Thanks for the votes and comments Carolyn and Akanksha. What is it like eating out as vegans in the USA, can you usually get vegan dishes in most restaurants, or is it difficult? I visited California and the West Coast around 10 years ago and I was vegetarian at the time, and didn't find it too much of a problem, but, as I say, since I have become vegan eating out has definitely got harder! But you get used to it. Vegetable samosas are a Godsend here, as a good vegan alternative to a sandwich; they sell them in a lot of shops and service stations, besides the supermarkets, and they are delicious! The veg ones are usually potato, as Akanksha says, and quite often other veg too with spices. Yummy and filling! (They do them with meat fillings as well, obviously of no interest to us!)
      Log in to reply.
      1. Akanksha
        Akanksha
        Thanks for your response Veganara..feels like a community when we talk. Just wanted to share some general advice for all readers about samosas. Don't go overboard with them as they are 'deep fried' and also made up of very fine flour which can constipate you.. Another interesting note is that you can also preserve samosas for a week or two if the filling is completely dry. I think I should be sharing the recipe soon!
        Log in to reply.
        1. Veganara
          Veganara
          Yes please do! I know samosas are not that healthy really; I don't have them all that often, just when I can't find anything else, mainly. As I say, they are small, but certainly filling! (no doubt through being deep-fried and the type of flour used!) I love spicy food generally, but try to just eat it in moderation, as they do tend to play havoc with my digestion.
          Log in to reply.
      2. Carolyn
        Carolyn
        Not a lot of vegan alternatives in the southern United States.
        Log in to reply.
  3. Roopam
    Yes I agree vegetarian options are fewer when eating out. Indian and Thai restaurants do offer more veg options.
    Log in to reply.

Explore

Connect with The Flaming Vegan

Sign Up to Vote!

10 second sign-up with Facebook or Google

Already a member? Log in to vote.