The Flaming Vegan

A Vegan and Vegetarian Blogging Extravaganza

Tips for Saving and Storing Seeds till Spring Planting
Facebook Tweet Google+ Pinterest Email More Sharing Options

Tips for Saving and Storing Seeds till Spring Planting

Some open-pollinated plants are passed down from one generation of farmers to the next and are referred to as heirloom plants. Some more recent plant selections, known as hybrids, are crosses between two different varieties of plants. Hybrid plants are often crossed to produced disease resistance plants, produce a larger quantity of fruits/vegetables or larger fruit/vegetable selections.

Saving and Storing Seeds

Saving seeds from fruits and vegetables that you eat to grow plants in the spring saves money. Select seeds from self-pollinating plants or plants that are cross-pollinated by insects for best results. Many vine crops may be cross-pollinated by the wind resulting in a less than desirable plant. Select plants that yield well, produce good fruit/vegetables and are not diseased for harvesting seeds.

Plastic containers with sealable lids, freezer bags or glass mason jars make excellent storage containers. The seeds may be separated and labeled in paper packets, then several packets placed in a large container for convenience. Place the containers in the refrigerator for ideal temperature control. Silica gel packets can be added to the containers to keep seeds dry. Silica can be purchased at a florist or craft supply store. Another option is to wrap two tablespoons of powdered milk in a Kleenex tissue and place in the container to keep seeds dry.

  • Cucumber Seeds – Place a brick or rock under a fully ripened cucumber and leave the cucumber attached to the plant so that it does not touch the soil for an additional two weeks. Pick the cucumber from the plant and bring indoors for another two weeks. Remove and save only the fully formed seeds. Place the seeds in a glass of cool water. After 12 hours save only the seeds that sink to the bottom of the glass. Allow the seeds to dry on a towel for a week, then store as mentioned in storage instructions in article.
  • Watermelon Seeds – Place only fully formed seeds in a glass of cool water. After 24 hours save the seeds that sink to the bottom of the glass and lay the seeds flat in a single layer on a towel to dry for a week. Store the seeds per storage instructions in article.
  • Cantaloupe or Honeydew Seeds – Collect only fully formed seeds. Clean seeds then place in a glass of clean cool water for five days, changing the water once a day. Lay the seeds flat to dry on a towel for one week. The seeds should be stored in a paper bag, and then placed in a freezer bag in the refrigerator for storage.
  • Tomato Seeds – Scoop out seeds from fully ripened tomatoes along with the surrounding gel. Place the seeds in a glass of water and allow them to sit in the water for several days. Pick the glass up several times during the day and spin the glass in a circular motion causing the water to spin. Strain the seeds after five days and spread the seeds flat to dry.
  • Pepper Seeds – Leave some peppers attached to the plant and allow the peppers to begin to wrinkle. Remove the seeds and spread the seeds flat to dry.
  • Beans – Allow the pods to dry and turn brown before removing from the plant. Remove the pods and spread them out to dry. The seeds can be left inside the pods until just before planting.
Healthy Snacks Delivered Monthly

Leave a Comment

  1. Carolyn
    Carolyn
    I plan to write an upcoming article on pumpkin seeds, saving storing and eating.
    Log in to reply.
    1. SnakeWitch
      Ooooh, eating pumpkin seeds. Too bad I'm not in a Halloween sort of place. They don't celebrate that here - they don't even celebrate November 1st, either. Anyways, vote number four!
      Log in to reply.
      1. Carolyn
        Carolyn
        Thanks Snake Witch! I appreciate the vote! Our church even has trunk or treat for the kiddos! Pumpkins can be utilized for interior and exterior fall decorations even when Halloween is not involved. Maybe that could be another article.
        Log in to reply.
  2. Anita Vegana
    Darn, we have a maximum number of votes! I have to come back tomorrow, then!
    Log in to reply.
    1. Carolyn
      Carolyn
      Anita Vegana, welcome to The Flaming Vegan. We receive additional votes each afternoon.
      Log in to reply.
  3. Roopam
    Wow...that's a lot of knowledge...great post Carolyn...voted!
    Log in to reply.
    1. Carolyn
      Carolyn
      Thanks Roopam! It is time to start saving seeds now for next Spring's garden!
      Log in to reply.
  4. dianabart
    dianabart
    Voted.. thanks for posting on our page Carolyn. I am just getting around to reading! :-)
    Log in to reply.
    1. Carolyn
      Carolyn
      Thanks for the vote Diana! I appreciate the opportunity to post a link to my article on "Faith, Food and Fitness."
      Log in to reply.
  5. kristo
    kristo
    Voted! None of my seeds are germinating, so I will try one of your tips!
    Log in to reply.
    1. Carolyn
      Carolyn
      Thanks for the vote Kristo! Hope the tips work for you!
      Log in to reply.
  6. Charlotte D
    #11 Yay
    Log in to reply.
    1. Carolyn
      Carolyn
      Thanks Charlotte! I appreciate the vote!
      Log in to reply.
  7. Veganara
    Veganara
    I voted for this the other day, but I didn't have time to comment! Great tips, thanks.
    Log in to reply.
    1. Carolyn
      Carolyn
      Thanks Veganara! I appreciate the vote and comment!
      Log in to reply.
  8. Teresa
    Teresa
    Vote #12 for you there, Carolyn.
    Log in to reply.
    1. Carolyn
      Carolyn
      Thanks Teresa! I appreciate the vote! Hope to see an article by you soon!
      Log in to reply.
      1. Teresa
        Teresa
        Will try to do so. Thanks. You're welcome for the vote.
        Log in to reply.
  9. pftsusan
    pftsusan
    #13. This is good. That's was I saying about the bees. They are needed to pollinate our plants. Carolyn, get all this information together and write a book about organic gardening.
    Log in to reply.
    1. Carolyn
      Carolyn
      Thanks Susan! I just thought it would be nice to write a series of articles under a different heading other than recipes...like I normally write.
      Log in to reply.

Explore

Connect with The Flaming Vegan

Sign Up to Vote!

10 second sign-up with Facebook or Google

Already a member? Log in to vote.